To be tax-deductible, the IRS wants to make sure that:  

  • You're giving away your money and that your donation is voluntary.
  • Your donation is going to a cause of your choice.
  • Your money is being donated to an entity that qualifies under section 170 of the IRS code.
  • You get a written receipt from the cause for donations over $250 and have an itemization of donations less than $250.
  • No deduction is taken prior to the money actually being disbursed by your agent. (Meaning that iGive.com has mailed the check to your cause).
 

Here's how our patent-pending system assures that these criteria are met:

  • The money from vendors by iGive.com on your behalf is a portion of the money you spent with them.  It's a rebate.  We've established an account for you that tracks this.
  • To make sure that the donation is voluntary, you may choose to receive the money directly, instead of sending it to your favorite cause.  These checks are disbursed in accordance with the cause donation payment schedule on this page.
  • You choose the cause that receives your donation.
  • We provide you with information supplied by the cause as to the tax-deductibility of donations made to that cause.
  • We do not allow donations over $250 to any single cause from your iGive.com shopping activity in any single month.
  • We provide the member with a detailed listing of the checks sent by us on your behalf to causes and of the purchases they cover.
 

For more information, see IRS Private Letter Ruling 9623035.  Remember, ultimately your personal tax situation affects your ability to take any tax deductions, so you should consult your tax advisor.

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